Sunday, June 8, 2014

Change is a Mindset

For many years New Milford High School was just like virtually every other public school in this country defined solely by traditional indicators of success such as standardized test scores, graduation rates, and acceptances to four year colleges. These indicators have become so embedded in the minds of those judging our schools and work that we, like everyone else, worked hard to focus only on initiatives that would hopefully produce favorable outcomes in those areas. If we were doing well we continued down the same path allowing the status quo to reign supreme.  The mentality of if it isn't broke than why fix it resonated so profoundly with us that we would not have even considered changing our ways.  If results were not what our stakeholders wanted this would then trigger meetings leading to the development of action plans to get us back on course. 


Image credit: http://be-virtual-assistant-wise.co.za/to-stay-in-business-it%E2%80%99s-vital-to-change-your-mindset/

For so long schools have resembled a hamster running on a wheel doing the same things over and over to improve sets of numbers.  We were no different and had succumbed to a fixed mindset. Every excuse in the book was at our disposal not to change and continue down the same path year after year. Heck, our education system has become so good at maintaining the status quo and enforcing compliance throughout that we and many others have been brainwashed into thinking any other course of action would be foolish.  If education is good for one thing it is making excuses not to move forward. There is still an innate desire to sustain a school structure and function that has remained relatively unchanged for well over a hundred years. This is a problem. It was a huge problem for us. We were in a rut and didn't even know it. Luckily change came in the form of a little blue bird that gave me the kick in the butt that I desperately needed back in 2009.  Being blessed with an amazing staff, student body, administrative team, and community provided the necessary support needed to move us forward.

As another school year comes to a close I can't but help reflect on the many successful initiatives that have been implemented this past year.  It is even more gratifying to see numerous other initiatives that were implemented over the past couple of years flourish.  Moving from a fixed to a growth mindset and feeding of the daily inspiration that connected learning provides gave me with the fuel to create a shared vision that eventually became a reality as a result of action. For change to be successful it must be sustained. As leaders we must not only be willing to see the process through, but we must also create conditions that promote a change mentality. It really is about moving from a fixed to a growth mindset, something that many educators and schools are either unwilling or afraid to do. The essential elements that work as catalysts for the change process include the following:

  • Empowerment
  • Autonomy
  • Ownership
  • Removing the fear of failure
  • Risk-taking
  • Support
  • Modeling
  • Flexibility
  • Collaboration
  • Communication

What I have learned is that if someone understands why change is needed and the elements above become an embedded component of school culture he/she or the system ultimately experience the value for themselves.  The change process then gets a boost from an intrinsic motivational force that not only jump starts the initiative, but allows for the embracement of change as opposed to looking for buy-in.  We should never have to "sell" people on better ways to do our noble work nor rely on mandates and directives. These traditional pathways used to drive change typically result in resentment, undermining, and failure.

This gets me back to the main point of my post and that is reflecting on the many changes that have been implemented and sustained at NMHS.  Even in the face of adversity in the form of education reform mandates, Common Core alignment, impending PARCC exams, new educator evaluation systems, loss of funding, and an aging infrastructure we have not only persevered, but proven that positive change can happen with the right mindset.  If we can overcome these challenges and experience success others can as well. Throughout the past couple of years we have also seen improvements in the "traditional" indicators of success by mainly focusing on creating a school that works better for our students as opposed to one that has always worked well for us.  Here is a short list of some of the changes that have been implemented and sustained:

  • Social media use as a communications, public relations, branding, professional growth, and student learning tool implemented in 2009. So many of my teachers are making the choice to integrate social media as a learning tool that I just can't list all of the examples.
  • Online courses through the Virtual High School implemented in 2010. Students now have access to over 250 unique courses that cater to their interests. 
  • Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) implemented in 2011.  The success of this initiative has hinged on our ability to ensure equity, give up control, trust our students, and provide educator support in the form of professional growth opportunities. Charging stations for the students were purchased this year and placed in all common areas.  The three guiding tenets of our BYOD initiative are to enhance learning, increase productivity, and conduct better research. See what CBS New York had to say.
  • The Academies @ NMHS implemented in 2011 as part of my superintendent's vision. These are a means to allow students to follow their passions in a cohort model of learning based on constructivist theory. The Academies are open to any and all students regardless of GPA who what to pursue more rigorous and authentic coursework and learning opportunities. This initiative compelled us to add over 20 new courses to our offerings to better meet the learning needs and interests of our students.
  • Independent OpenCourseware Study (IOCS) implemented in 2012. Students elect to take OpenCourseware and receive honors credit once they demonstrate what they have learned through a non-traditional presentation.
  • Google Apps For Education (GAFE) implemented in 2012 empowering students and staff to learn collaboratively in the cloud.
  • Flipped classroom and instructional model implemented in 2012. A variety of teachers have moved to this model consistently to take advantage of instructional time. The best part is that NMHS teachers themselves are creating the interactive content as opposed to relying on Khan Academy. See what CBS New York had to say.
  • Grading reform implemented in 2012.  A committee was formed to improve our grading practices that resulted in a failure floor and seven steps that had to be met before student can receive a failing grade. All student failures are now reviewed by me to ensure that the seven steps have been met. This was probably the most difficult change initiative I have ever been a part of. If you want a copy of this just add your email in the comments section at the bottom of this post. 
  • The Professional Growth Period (PGP) implemented in 2013.  By cutting all non-instructional duties teachers now have two or three 48 minute periods during the week to follow their learning passions based on the Google 80/20 model.  The rise in many innovative practices have resulted by creating this job embedded model for growth.  I love reviewing the learning portfolios my teachers develop each year to showcase how this time was used to improve professional practice.
  • Makerspace added to the library in 2013. I have written extensively about this space, which has transformed learning thanks to the leadership of Laura Fleming. See what CBS New York had to say.
  • Creation of a digital badge platform to acknowledge the informal learning of teachers implemented in 2013 by Laura Fleming.
  • 3D virtual learning implemented in 2013 using Protosphere. See what CBS New York had to say.
  • McREL Teacher Evaluation Tool implemented in 2013.  This required a huge shift from how we have observed and evaluated teachers for a very long time.  Google Forms were utilized to solicit anonymous feedback from staff members about the roll out, process, and value of the new tool.  This feedback was then used by the administrative team to improve the use of the tool.  
I need to stop here, but I think you get the point.  We have transformed the teaching and learning culture at NMHS that begins and ends with a growth mindset.  The time for excuses, talk, opinions, and fear needs to end if our goal is really about improving teaching, learning, and leadership outcomes. Leadership is about action, not position or ideas that just get pushed around. We continue to push ourselves to create a better school.

So what's stopping you?

42 comments:

  1. I can't imagine what it must be like to be a student, or teacher, at New Milford. I love the comment, " we should never have to sell people on better ways to do our noble work." I also think the PGP periods must be incredibly empowering for teachers. Finally, the mindset that your staff is creating a school that works better for the "kids" is right on. Thank you for sharing and inspiring!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great article and very good model for me to follow at my school. To me, the essential point is to be the change you want to see. It really doesn't help to wait for change to happen, if you do nothing will change. Large institutions are incapable of reforming themselves. Real change needs to start at the school level with the principal and staff of each school.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Eric, I love this post. I hope your staff realizes what inspiration you all give to so many other schools. I would love to learn more about the "failure floor" and seven steps. Grading reform is some of the toughest work my building has faced too. Email is meadel@corinthcsd.com. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you for the post. We have implemented the Professional Growth Period on our campus but labeled it as the Innovation Challenge. The first year has had mixed results but teachers are already talking about what they want to focus on in the upcoming school year for their Innovation Challenge. We still struggle with ensuring equitable grading policies so I would like to see what your grading reform looks like.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Eric.. can you share some specific details about your new grading system? Or if you have blogged about it before, a link?

    ReplyDelete
  6. If you would like the grading philosophy we developed either place your email in the comments section or contact me at esheninger@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would love a copy of the grading philosophy.
      Rebekah.cook@svcc.sa.edu.au

      Delete
    2. I would love one as well! sarah.stevenson914@gmail.com

      Delete
    3. I would also love a copy! adele.ryan@gmail.com

      Delete
  7. Thank you for this inspiring post, Eric. I have heard so much about New Milford and agree that change must occur at the school level despite all the mandates/new initiatives from the State or District. I love your Professional Growth Period idea and would like to implement something similar at our elementary school. Perhaps it can be part of our "professional learning" requirement from the State as part of the teacher evaluation system. Thank you for sharing and inspiring.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I would love to hear specifics on your grading system. Please email me @ mgloff@hamiltonisd.org Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would also love to see more about your grading system, kstucky@ics.edu.sg
      Thanks!

      Delete
  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Great article on implementing change and focusing on growth - both hard things to do anywhere, but especially in the school system. Well done!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I want to share with you that YOU have inspired me as I grow in my journey as an education administrator. I have learned so much from following you on Twitter, reading your book and your blog! I am a true fan and grateful to learn from one of the best. Please send me info on your grading system. I'm sure it can be adapted for the elementary level as well: wehaynes@hotmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  12. I would love more information on your grading system. Please send it to Larissa.bray@washington.k12.mo.us. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I have been following you on Twitter for awhile now, Eric! In fact I think you were one of my first follows when I started with the blue bird! Thank you for your innovative and informative posts.

    I would also like more information about your grading system. You may send it to me at troyberryman@sacredheartnorfolk.com

    ReplyDelete
  14. Great work Eric - pcaposey@mail.meridian223.org

    ReplyDelete
  15. Please send me your grading policy (7 steps). siglerl@apaches.k12.in.us

    ReplyDelete
  16. Wow, so many cool things going on in this post! I love how forward thinking and innovative you guys are at NMHS. I work for codehs.com, a website that teaches HS students to code - we consistently find that the teachers reaching out to us are teachers we all wish we had more of in high school. Self motivated, tech forward, and above all, incredibly invested in the success of their students. It sounds like you've got a school full of teachers like that.

    I'd also appreciate a copy of the grading policy - will@codehs.com. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi, I would love to get more info about the grading reform. My email is kristina.uhlikova@narnia.sk

    Thank you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I would also like more information about your grading system and the 7 steps. You may send it to me at kfairman@hbuhsd.edu. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  19. Please send me info on your 7 step grading policy to evigilia@sdcoe.net Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks for sharing your work! I am interested in learning more about your grading philosophy. burgosl@verona.k12.wi.us

    ReplyDelete
  21. I would be interested in learning more about your grading philosophy. Can you send it to bknight@perryschools.org Thanks for the post!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Just found your blog today. Great information on how to accomplish change within the educational setting. I would like to have information about your grading program. Please send to ajones@lcctc.org

    ReplyDelete
  23. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I appreciate you sharing the initiatives used to transform your school. I am interested in the grading steps. Please send me a copy to corlisbar@gmail.com. thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Thank you for sharing! I would like to learn more about your 7 steps to prevent failure and grading reform. Thank you.
    sandyprice@TrinityL.org

    ReplyDelete
  26. I enjoyed your article. Sounds like great things are happening in our building. I would love more information on your grading reform. Thanks! kmoisson@janesville.k12.wi.us

    ReplyDelete
  27. I would love a copy of your grading policy. Thanks Eric! shane.hild@filer.k12.id.us

    ReplyDelete
  28. After reading your post, I can't wait to hear you speak at KASA! Your work is so inspiring and I am looking forward to learning more. The growth mindset is my passion and I am anxious to hear how you made this "visible". I also would like a copy of the grading work:
    Amy.Razor@pendleton.kyschools.us

    ReplyDelete
  29. Thank you for your sharing. Love it! I would to know about the grading reforms that you have carried out. My email is shoonl6292@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  30. Would you please send a copy of your grading reforms. I find that very interesting. Thanks in advance.

    chambersk@sccsd.k12.ar.us

    ReplyDelete
  31. Kent - I just saw your request and will get that document out to you today.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Hi, I would love a copy of the grading policy. Thanks Eric! eframart@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  33. Please send me grading info.

    Nate.niemi@boone.kyschools.us

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  34. Love the idea of digital badges!!!!!!!!!!! I would also like to take a look at your teams work on grading. Thank! rvanbrun@esboces.org

    ReplyDelete
  35. Eric,

    Firstly, thank you for sharing this enlightening post about the shift that has happened for you and your colleagues.

    Like many others, I too would appreciate a copy of your teams grading, (donovan.hall@kics.sd).

    I particularly like your PGP idea and whilst on a recent course I saw something like this tied in with the 2nd and 3rd year of the teacher appraisal system. It provided an opportunity for teachers to follower personal professional areas of interested with other colleagues, be they within the school, district or globally.

    Thanks once again for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  36. I would love a copy of your grading policy, Eric. My district is making a lot of change and one of these changes is grading policy. We're ready for something innovative! Thanks for sharing. spaxton@ssusd.org

    ReplyDelete
  37. Is this just your school or is this district wide?

    ReplyDelete